Special CSH-CEH Virtual Seminar Series

Note: This talk series is triggered by the current coronavirus crisis, which has forced the cancellation of the regular CSH Colloquium and Seminar series. To keep the intellectual momentum, the CSH has partnered with the Centre for Exoplanets & Habitability (CEH) of the University of Warwick to co-host a joint virtual seminar series. Hosted jointly by Kevin Heng (CSH) and Dave Armstrong (CEH).

Day & Time: Every Wednesday from 14:00-15:00 (Central European Time)
British Time: 13:00-14:00
U.S. East Coast Time: 09:00-10:00

Format and Ground Rules:
- 45 minutes of talk time.
- Interruptions are OK, but please do so constructively.
- 15 minutes of discussion and Q&A.


25/03/20 (Wed): Prof. Richard Dawid (University of Stockholm)
Title: The Significance of Non-Empirical Confirmation in Fundamental Physics
Abstract: In the absence of empirical confirmation, scientists may judge a theory’s chances of being viable based on a wide range of arguments. We will discuss Dawid's view that a considerable degree of trust in an empirically unconfirmed theory could be generated based on 'non-empirical theory confirmation’ (Dawid 2013).


01/04/20 (Wed): Prof. Jonathan Tan (Chalmers University)
Title: A Light in the Dark - Massive Star Birth Through Cosmic Time
Abstract: Massive stars have played a dominant role in shaping our universe since its earliest times, but there is still no consensus on the mechanism by which they form. I review the physics that is important for massive star formation and the connection this process may have with star cluster formation. I then focus on a particular theoretical model, Turbulent Core Accretion, which assumes the initial conditions are massive, turbulent, magnetized cores of gas and dust that are reasonably close to virial equilibrium. Our group has been exploring this scenario via analytic models and numerical simulations of the physics and chemistry of the interstellar medium, ranging from the earliest pre-stellar core phase to protostellar cores being impacted by strong self-feedback. Crucially, these models can now be tested in detail with ALMA, SOFIA and other facilities, and I present the latest results from multiple projects that are zooming in to massive star birth in the darkest shadows of giant molecular clouds. Extension of this work has the potential to also determine how the full stellar initial mass function is established across different Galactic environments. Finally, I discuss an application of massive star formation theory to the early universe: how massive were the first stars and could they have been the progenitors of supermassive black holes?


08/04/20 (Wed): Prof./Dr. X (University of Y)
Title: tbd
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15/04/20 (Wed): Prof./Dr. X (University of Y)
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22/04/20 (Wed): Prof./Dr. X (University of Y)
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29/04/20 (Wed): Prof./Dr. X (University of Y)
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06/05/20 (Wed): Prof./Dr. X (University of Y)
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13/05/20 (Wed): Prof./Dr. X (University of Y)
Title: tbd
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